Project Details:

Title:
Expanding the Genetic Base of U.S. Soybean Production to Improve Productivity (Year 1 of 1232)

Parent Project: This is the first year of this project.
Checkoff Organization:United Soybean Board
Categories:Breeding & genetics
Organization Project Code:1232
Project Year:2011
Lead Principal Investigator:Randall Nelson (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)
Co-Principal Investigators:
Thomas E Carter Jr (North Carolina State University)
H Roger Boerma (University of Georgia)
Brian Diers (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)
James Orf (University of Minnesota)
Pengyin Chen (University of Missouri)
Grover Shannon (University of Missouri)
George Graef (University of Nebraska)
Rouf Mian (USDA/ARS-Ohio State University)
Rusty Smith (USDA/ARS-University of Illinois)
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Contributing Organizations

Funding Institutions

Information and Results

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Project Summary

In the new project we are proposing specific, additional research that will build upon these significant genetic advances to continue to increase the yield of experimental lines and varieties that we develop, expand our knowledge of the specific genes that can increase yield, exploit new capacities in DNA marker technology to expand our understanding of genetic diversity as it relates to seed yield, and improve seed quality for soybean production in the mid-south.

Project Objectives

1) Development of new high yielding experimental lines from exotic germplasm and distribution of these lines to U.S. soybean breeders to use as parents in new commercial varieties.
2) Development of high yielding experimental lines derived from exotic germplasm with improved seed quality and germination under the production conditions of the early planting production system in the mid-south.

Project Deliverables

1. Continue to develop new varieties and/or experimental lines, derived from different exotic germplasm, that are equal to or better than the best commercial varieties in yield.
2. Improve the yield and germination of seed in lines grown in the early planting production system in the mid-south.
3. Identify new regions of the soybean chromosome in exotic germplasm that affect yield and move these into regions of high yielding lines.

Progress of Work

Final Project Results

Benefit to Soybean Farmers

Performance Metrics

Short-term success of this project will be measured by 1) the new varieties and/or experimental lines derived from exotic germplasm that are equal to or better than the best commercial varieties in yield and the improved germplasm we provide to soybean breeders, especially in private industry, for cooperative testing and use as parents in developing new varieties, 2) the exotic germplasm identified with improved seed quality and germination under the early planting production system in the mid-south and the high yielding experimental lines adapted to the early planting production system that incorporate these improved seed quality traits, and 3) the identified chromosomal segments or quantitative trait loci (QTL) derived from exotic germplasm that can increase seed yield and the confirmation of those QTL in a second population. The long term success of this research will be measured by the incorporation of the new genes for yield from exotic germplasm into higher yielding varieties grown by U.S. soybean farmers and the identification of DNA markers to assist in the selection of those favorable genes.

Project Years