Project Details:

Title:
Genes and Markers for Resistance to Phytophthora Sojae, Pythium spp., and Fusarium Graminearum in Soybean (Year 1 of 1420-532-5659)

Parent Project: This is the first year of this project.
Checkoff Organization:United Soybean Board
Categories:Breeding & genetics, Soybean diseases
Organization Project Code:1420-532-5659
Project Year:2014
Lead Principal Investigator:Anne Dorrance (The Ohio State University)
Co-Principal Investigators:
Chris Taylor (Danforth Plant Science Center)
Alison Robertson (Iowa State University)
Feng Qu (Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center)
Leah McHale (The Ohio State University)
Henry Nguyen (University of Missouri)
Grover Shannon (University of Missouri)
Michelle Graham (USDA/ARS-Iowa State University)
Rouf Mian (USDA/ARS-Ohio State University)
M A Saghai Maroof (Virginia Tech)
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Keywords: Fusarium species, Phytophtora sojae, Pythium spp., Soybean Disease Resistance

Contributing Organizations

Funding Institutions

Information and Results

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Project Summary

Biotic stresses can lead to yield and profit losses due to replanting and delayed planting combined with season long root rot. Several key pathogens that contribute to stand reduction and yield loss are: Phytophthora sojae, numerous Pythium spp., and Fusarium graminearum. Seed companies require markers directly tied to the specific allele of a gene that contributes to the expression of resistance. Our collective goal is to identify and characterize candidate genes, both R-gene and those associated with quantitative trait loci (QTL) mediated resistance, that protect soybeans from these pathogens for potential deployment in commercial soybean varieties via marker-assisted selection or gene cloning.

Project Objectives

1. Characterize and fine map sources of potentially novel Rps genes towards Phytophthora sojae.
2. Using Virus Induced Gene Silencing (VIGS) to assay the function of.
3. Identify QTL (Quantitative Trait Loci) essential for resistance towards seed and seedling pathogens: Phytophthora sojae, several Pythium spp., and Fusarium graminearum.
4. Fine map QTL and identify key genes involved in the expression of resistance in these populations.
5. Functional analysis of key genes associated with partial resistance to P. sojae, Pythium spp. and F. graminearum.
6. Development of highly adapted germplasm with QTL identified in these studies.
7. Assess the population diversity of Phytophthora sojae and key Pythium spp. throughout the Midwest, targeted towards identifying key pathotypes or effectors required for screening.

Project Deliverables

Expected Outputs/Deliverables:
1. Characterize and fine map sources of potentially novel Rps genes towards Phytophthora sojae.
Germplasm/varieties/markers associated with novel Rps genes for Phytophthora sojae.
Numerous plant introductions from the soybean germplasm collection have been identified with potentially novel Rps genes.
2. Using Virus Induced Gene Silencing (VIGS) to assay the function of candidate P. sojae Rps genes.
Within these loci, we have identified numerous candidate R-genes. It is important to identify the correct sequence to facilitate rapid development of new varieties. Thus, our collective goal is to fine map these novel R-gene loci, compare R-gene sequences, and verify the activity using virus induced gene silencing.
3. Identify QTL to those that are essential for resistance towards seed and seedling pathogens: Phytophthora sojae, Pythium spp., and Fusarium graminearum.
4. Fine map QTL and identify key genes involved in the expression of resistance in these populations.
5. Functional analysis of key genes associated with partial resistance to P. sojae, Pythium spp. and F. graminearum.
For these 3 objectives/strategies, we will have developed molecular markers that are directly tied to genes associated with the resistance response to these key soybean seed and root pathogens. In addition, we will have available, germplasm with key QTL to use in variety development, varieties for release from different backgrounds will be in progress.
In addition we will have identified numerous sources of resistance to the several key pathogens and will have populations, genetic maps of these populations for others to screen and map other traits.
6. Development of highly adapted germplasm with QTL identified in these studies.
Develop and release germplasm and varieties with resistance to multiple soybean root pathogens.
7. Assess the population diversity of Phytophthora sojae and key Pythium spp. throughout the Midwest, targeted towards identifying key pathotypes or effectors required for screening.
Characterized pathogenisolate collections that can be used for screening and comparison of resistance response.

Progress of Work

Final Project Results

Benefit to Soybean Farmers

Performance Metrics

1. This project was initiated preceding the incorporation and standardization of KPIs. The goals of the project are as follows:

Quantitative outputs are the direct generation and analysis of sequence data on critical pathways to amino acid synthesis in soybean development.

2. Quantitative measures are also publications in journals and abstracts and deposit of data in public databases that disseminate the knowledge gained to the larger community of soybean geneticists and breeders and other plant scientists.

3. The long range performance indicators would be a % change to increase protein quantity or quality of the amino acid profile of soybeans.

Project Years