Project Details:

Title:
Increasing the rate of genetic gain for yield in soybean breeding programs

Parent Project: This is the first year of this project.
Checkoff Organization:North Central Soybean Research Program
Categories:Breeding & genetics
Organization Project Code:NCSRP
Project Year:2017
Lead Principal Investigator:Leah McHale (The Ohio State University)
Co-Principal Investigators:
William Beavis (Iowa State University)
Silvia Cianzio (Iowa State University)
David Hyten (Iowa State University)
Asheesh Singh (Iowa State University)
William Schapaugh (Kansas State University)
Dechun Wang (Michigan State University)
Jianxin Ma (Purdue University)
Katy M Rainey (Purdue University)
Brian Diers (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)
Matthew Hudson (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)
Aaron Lorenz (University of Minnesota)
Pengyin Chen (University of Missouri)
Andrew Scaboo (University of Missouri)
George Graef (University of Nebraska)
Steven Clough (USDA/ARS-University of Illinois)
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Contributing Organizations

Funding Institutions

Information and Results

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Project Summary

Increases in soybean yield through breeding have been slower than growers expect, with the rate of yield increases for soybean substantially less than that for corn. A collaborative study led by Diers of a historic set of MG II-IV varieties released from 1923 to 2008 revealed a recent rate of genetic gain of 0.43 bu/ac/yr, whereas reports of genetic gain in corn generally range from 1.0 to 1.2 bu/ac/yr.

There are several possible targets for improving the rate of gain in soybean grain yield if the equation of genetic gain is considered. The rate of genetic gain from a single cycle of selection can be predicted by the breeders’ equation (?G = S[sA/sP]), where ?G is the change in yield from the parental generation to the progeny of selected parents in a single breeding cycle, S is the selection differential between parents and progeny, sA is additive genetic variance, and sP is total phenotypic variance, including variance due to the environment and error. Accordingly, there are several possible targets for improving the rate of genetic gain in soybean grain yield, including increasing the selection intensity (S), increasing measurement accuracy, increasing genetic diversity and additive genetic variance, and decreasing the amount of time required for each breeding cycle. Through coordinated activities to be carried out across twelve breeding programs in the North Central region, Objectives 1, 2 and 3 will each address one or more of these target areas, with the overall goal of increasing the rate of genetic gain for yield in soybean. Objective 4 is aimed at developing a metric to accurately assess realized genetic gain for yield on an annual basis.

The proposed activities build on and encompass the previous proposal lead by Dr. Aaron Lorenz, “Initiation of a genomic selection pipeline for public soybean breeders in the North Central Region” as well as concluded NCSRP funded research led by Drs. George Graef, Brian Diers, and Randall Nelson.

Project Objectives

OBJECTIVE 1: Increasing selection intensity and decreasing non-genetic sources of variability through improved progeny row testing

OBJECTIVE 2: Increasing selection coefficient and decreasing length of breeding cycle through genomic selection

OBJECTIVE 3: Increasing additive genetic variance

OBJECTIVE 4: Development of a metric to estimate genetic gains on an annual basis

Project Deliverables

• Observed data, selection information, pedigree and plot layout (range-row information), and shipment of seed for planting for breeders at 11 locations.
• Overall data management plan, preliminary analytical pipeline implemented and coordinated by the Rainey lab.
• All breeders’ lines ranked simultaneously for yield breeding value, maturity prediction and a metric of diversity. Lines selected using additional sources of information may provide higher rank-order correlation with the performance of preliminary yield trails.

Progress of Work

Update:
Project report

April 1, 2017

INCREASING THE RATE OF GENETIC GAIN FOR YIELD IN SOYBEAN BREEDING PROGRAMS

The group had a productive meeting at the Soybean Breeders’ Workshop in St. Louis in February. During this meeting, personnel changes were discussed as well as project updates and any concerns were presented to the group and are summarized in the attached report.

View uploaded report PDF file

Update:
Project Report

October 1, 2017

INCREASING THE RATE OF GENETIC GAIN FOR YIELD IN SOYBEAN BREEDING PROGRAMS

In lieu of our planned project meeting at the World Soybean Research Conference in Savannah, we had a conference call on September 21, 2017. The call was productive and served to update project members on progress, remind those participating in multi-state field trials of expectations, and to vet details of experimental design.

Earlier this year, the group had brain-storming session over email in which we decided that it would be wise for us to “brand” our project with a name that can envelope this group, but also serve as an umbrella that could potentially include future projects (hopefully from other funding sources, including federal grants). The name that was chosen was SOYGEN: Science-Optimized Yield Gains across ENvironments. A project website is under development.

Specific updates for each objective are in the attached.

View uploaded report PDF file

Final Project Results

Benefit to Soybean Farmers

Performance Metrics

Project Years

YearProject Title (each year)
2021SOYGEN2: Increasing SB genetic gain for yield & seed composition by developing tools, know-how & community among public breeders in the NC US
2021SOYGEN2: Increasing SB genetic gain for yield & seed composition by developing tools, know-how & community among public breeders in the NC US
2020Inceasing soybean genetic gain for yield by developing tools, know-how and community among public breeders in the north central US
2020Inceasing soybean genetic gain for yield by developing tools, know-how and community among public breeders in the north central US
2019Increasing the rate of genetic gain for yield in soybean breeding programs
2018Increasing the rate of genetic gain for yield in soybean breeding programs
2017Increasing the rate of genetic gain for yield in soybean breeding programs