Project Details:

Title:
Achieving 100 Bu/A soybean yields: on-farm research and sharing high yield protocols with South Dakota soybean producers FY19

Parent Project: Achieving 100 bushel/acre soybean yields: Developing, testing, and sharing high yield protocols with South Dakota soybean producers
Checkoff Organization:South Dakota Soybean Research and Promotion Council
Categories:Crop management systems, Communication
Organization Project Code:
Project Year:2019
Lead Principal Investigator:David Clay (South Dakota State University)
Co-Principal Investigators:
Keywords:

Contributing Organizations

Funding Institutions

Information and Results

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Project Summary

Increasing yields in a highly variable environment requires the development of adaptable systems that link advances in crop genetics with an improved understanding of ecosystem functioning and soil health. The proposed project will build the infrastructure where locally led production and management questions are identified and tested.

The activities for the upcoming year include:
1) initiate new research designed to determine the influence of foliar fertilizers (macro, N and S, and micronutrients) on profitability and the ability of tissue samples to assess yields and identify nutrient deficient soybean plants;
2) continue the on-farm research program and expand the number of on-farm research from 113 studies in 2017 to 130 studies in 2018;
3) initiate research designed to determine the importance of soil health in optimizing soybean yields;
4) continue research designed to assess the impact increasing salt concentration and drainage on yields;
5) assess the feasibility of using publicly available variety testing programs for making site-specific cultivar selection; and
6) deliver information to producers through talks, Soy100, AgOutlook, website and updated soybean production manual.

Routine advisory board meetings will be held in 2018 and 2019. Due to SD environmental conditions, the on-farm studies are producing findings that are unique to South Dakota and they are not duplicated in studies conducted in other states. During 2017, on-farm studies evaluated cover crops, late season N, fungicide seed treatments, seeding rates, soybean growth promoters, micronutrients, and techniques to reduce the impact of salts on soybean growth.

Project Objectives

The projects goal is to provide fundamental information needed to optimize soybean long-term profitability.
The project will:
1. Determine the influence of foliar fertilizers (macro, N and S, and micronutrients) on soybean profitability (Drs. Nleya and Kovacs)

2. Expand the number of on-farm research from 113 studies in 2017 to 130 studies in 2018. We would also like to increase the number of farmers involved in on-farm studies. A recently completed producer survey asked the survey participants if they were willing to be involved in on-farm studies. Over 50 producers indicated their willingness. We will send postcards out to these farmers followed by a phone call.

3. Create a database and search routines for analyzing data contained in the Crop Testing Programs (CPT). The search routine will allow search by climate information, maturity rating, and the genomic characteristics (Drs. Wu and Kleinjan).

4. Distribute information to soybean growers and farmer collaborators by:
a. Populating the on-farm website with archived producer information,
b. Delivering on-farm producer reports to the on-farm webpage,
c. Summarizing findings from on-farm studies and prepare fact sheets. This year we will focus on the on-farm late season N and the K fertilizer trials,
d. Assisting in AgOutlook and organizing the Soy100 meeting,
e. Reviewing and improving the soybean BMP manual,
f. Organizing investigator and on-farm advisory board meetings to assess success and identify on-farm priorities.

Project Deliverables

We will help increase South Dakota soybean yields by:
1) preparing final reports for targeted experiments,
2) creating fact sheets from the late-season N and K fertilizer experiments;
3) providing farmer training for on-farm research;
4) expanding the on-farm studies to over 130 studies;
5) populating a searchable on-farm research database;
6) organizing the Soy100;
7) organizing the poster sessions at AgOutlook; and
8) continuing the review process of the soybean production manual.
This project will allow us to better match solutions to problems and create locally based, flexible, high yield roadmaps, which will be validated in research conducted in producer’s fields when appropriate.

Progress of Work

Updated February 5, 2020:

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Updated February 5, 2020:

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Updated February 5, 2020:

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Updated February 5, 2020:

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Final Project Results

Updated February 5, 2020:

Benefit to Soybean Farmers

From 1983 to 2013, the state average soybean yield has increased annually at a rate of 0.34 bu/ac per year, while the crop testing yields for maturity group 2 have increased at a rate of 0.66 bu/ac per year. The growing gap between the state average and crop testing indicates that the soybean genetic potential has not been fully achieved. The overall goal of this research is to help SD soybean producers close this gap.

Performance Metrics

Project Years

YearProject Title (each year)
2022Achieving 100 Bu/A soybean yields: on-farm research and sharing high yield protocols with South Dakota soybean producers
2021Achieving 100 Bu/A soybean yields: on-farm research and sharing high yield protocols with South Dakota soybean producers
2020Achieving 100 Bu/A soybean yields: on-farm research and sharing high yield protocols with South Dakota soybean producers FY20
2019Achieving 100 Bu/A soybean yields: on-farm research and sharing high yield protocols with South Dakota soybean producers FY19
2016Achieving 100 bushel/acre soybean yields: Developing, testing, and sharing high yield protocols with South Dakota soybean producers
2015Achieving 100 bushel/acre soybean yields: Developing, testing, and sharing high yield protocols with South Dakota soybean producers