Project Details:

Title:
Developing tools to protect soybean stand from seedling disease caused by Pythium species

Parent Project: Developing tools to protect soybean stand from seedling disease caused by Pythium species
Checkoff Organization:Iowa Soybean Association
Categories:Soybean diseases
Organization Project Code:450-30-53
Project Year:2017
Lead Principal Investigator:Alison Robertson (Iowa State University)
Co-Principal Investigators:
Christopher J Anderson (Iowa State University)
Arti Singh (Iowa State University)
Keywords:

Contributing Organizations

Funding Institutions

Information and Results

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Project Summary

To optimize yield, soybean farmers are planting earlier each year. It is not uncommon to have cold fronts (abundant rainfall and soil temperatures dropping below 55F) occurring during the planting period (mid-April through mid-May).

Cold, wet soils slow the germination process and increase the risk of seedling disease caused by Pythium species that can result in stand loss. As seed costs increase, it becomes economically important to ensure that every seed planted becomes a productive plant. Our proposed research “will increase soybean farmer competitiveness”, through the development of improved tools (seedling disease risk model, genetic markers for Pythium resistance and cold tolerance) that will improve “productivity and profitability while improving environmental stewardship”. Specifically, this project will improve our understanding of the soybean-Pythium interaction. We expect to identify the germination/emergence developmental stage(s) at which soybean is most susceptible to infection and evaluate the effect of cold stress on this susceptibility. These data together with data from seed treatment field trials (funded by ISA and industry) will be used to develop a seedling disease risk tool that soybean farmers could use to schedule planting and make seed treatment decisions to ensure successful stand establishment. Moreover, we will identify screen varieties that vary in cold tolerance for susceptibility to Pythium species to determine if there is a relationship.

Project Objectives

Objective 1: To determine how timing of cold stress affects susceptibility to Pythium
Objective 2: To identify when during germination and emergence are soybeans most susceptible to Pythium
Objective 3: To determine if cold tolerance and susceptibility to Pythium is correlated
Objective 4. To develop a seedling disease risk assessment model that growers could use to schedule planting

Project Deliverables

Identify period during germination when cold stress increases susceptibility to Pythium (Obj. 1)
Identify when during germination and emergence soybean is most susceptible to Pythium (Obj. 2)
Screen NAM parents for cold tolerance (Obj. 3)
Phenotype RILs for cold tolerance (Obj. 3)
Identify QTL for cold tolerance and compare with QTL for Pythium resistance (Obj. 3)
Capture seedling disease and weather data (Obj. 4)
Develop an empirical seedling disease risk model (Obj. 4)
Test seedling disease risk model (Obj. 4)
Share data with Iowa stakeholders via twitter, blogs, newsletters,
Identification of genetic markers for improved cold tolerance and Pythium resistance
Identification of germplasm with resistance to Pythium species and improved cold tolerance
Seedling disease risk model
Peer reviewed manuscripts

Progress of Work

Update:
Objective 1. Experiments are complete and we are currently writing two peer-reviewed manuscripts based on our data. Moreover, we shared these data at the ISA Research conference in February. Similar results occurred when cold stress was 38F or 50F. Similarly there was little effect of cold stress duration. We detected an effect of time of cold stress after planting on emergence. We found that cold stress that occurs 48 to 96 h after planting reduced emergence due to increased infection by Pythium. Seed treatments were very effective at protecting the seed during cold stress periods.
Objective 2. In progress. We have had to modify our methods somewhat and this has resulted in a delay in collecting data.
Objective 3. This objective is complete.
Objective 4. Dr Chris Anderson left ISU and consequently work on this objective has been delayed. We are identifying someone else to help us analyze and interpret the data.

Final Project Results

Update:
Objective 1. The PhD student assigned to this objective and objective 3 successfully defended his PhD dissertation in Summer. A paper was submitted to Canadian Journal of Plant Pathology. A second paper will be submitted to Phytopathology this Fall. A poster was presented at the annual APS meeting in Texas. A PDF of the poster is attached.
Objective 2. Experiments were completed in summer. Data are being analyzed and interpreted. A poster was presented at the annual APS meeting in Texas. A PDF of the poster is attached.
Objective 3. This objective is complete.
Objective 4. Drs Sotorios Archonopolis and Andy Van Loocke will work with Dr Robertson and an M.S. student in statistics on developing the pre plant risk model. The student is currently capturing data.

View uploaded report PDF file

Benefit to Soybean Farmers

Reduced stand losses due to seedling disease
Improved profitability of soybean farmers through strategic use of seed treatment, optimized planting dates resulting in less risk of replanting, and higher yields.

Performance Metrics

Project Years