Project Details:

Title:
Getting to know the players on seedling disease field

Parent Project: Getting to know the players on seedling disease field
Checkoff Organization:Iowa Soybean Association
Categories:Soybean diseases
Organization Project Code:
Project Year:2014
Lead Principal Investigator:Alison Robertson (Iowa State University)
Co-Principal Investigators:
Keywords: Outreach and Education, Soybean Seedling Diseases

Contributing Organizations

Funding Institutions

Information and Results

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Project Summary

Seedling diseases are caused by oomycetes, namely Pythium spp. and Phytophthora sojae, and fungi (Fusarium ssp. and Rhizoctonia solani). With the exception of P. sojae, there is limited information on the biology and epidemiology of many of the pathogens associated with seedling diseases. The goal of this project is to improve our understanding of the biology and epidemiology of Pythium ssp. causing seedling disease.

Project Objectives

1. Characterize the biology of Pythium spp. that causes seedling disease.
2. Determine the optimum conditions for infection of and disease development in soybean seedlings by Pythium spp.
3. Assess the sensitivity of Pythium spp. to seed treatment fungicides.
4. Improve farmer and industry knowledge of seedling pathogen biology and epidemiology.

Project Deliverables

Progress of Work

Update:

Final Project Results

We have completed pathogenicity and fungicide assays of Pythium lutarium, P. oopapillum, P. torulosum, and P. sylvaticum with strains collected from soybean and corn in Iowa. Twelve isolates that are representative of four species of Pythium, P. lutarium, P. oopapillum, P. torulosum, and P. sylvaticum, were screened for sensitivity to fungicides in a Petri dish assay. Fungicides evaluated include metalaxyl (Allegience), ethaboxam (new fungicide from Valent), azoxystrobin (Dynasty), pyraclostrobin (Headline), trifloxystrobin (Trilex), captan, and thiram. We have shown that temperature affects pathogenicity and fungicide sensitivity. This is the first time temperature has been reported to affect fungicide sensitivity and implies that soil temperatures at planting could influence the efficacy of a seed treatment depending on the pathogen profile of the field.

Four presentations detailing results of this research were given to approximately 2000 stakeholders in Iowa at various ISU Extension and Outreach programs. Furthermore, a trifold publication entitled ‘Scouting for Pythium root rot of soybean’ that describes this seedling disease was distributed to 12 North Central states and Ontario, Canada.

Benefit to Soybean Farmers

Four presentations detailing results of this research were given to approximately 2000 stakeholders in Iowa at various ISU Extension and Outreach programs. Furthermore, a trifold publication entitled 'Scouting for Pythium root rot of soybean' that describes this seedling disease was distributed to 12 North Central states and Ontario, Canada.

Performance Metrics

Project Years